Examples

Principle

Keep it simple

Connect your practice

Good

Surfacing the benefits of connecting to HMRC, and why it's important for the customer to engage in the setup flow.

Visualising the connection process to emphasise its simplicity, and keep the friction level low - "This is all it takes".

Not so good

Don't overload a zero state with supporting info that can be displayed further in the flow, and avoid technical or complex language at all costs. Keep it simple.

Insights

This zero state is for accountants in QBOA, and user testing showed a preference for more straightforward messaging. For example, "Connect your practice" as a headline tested slightly better than "Making tax delightful".

Something's not right. Try again.

Unspecified error message

Something's not right. Try again.

Copy to clipboard

Good

Something's not right. Try again.

We use this message when we're not sure what caused the error or when the error is so complicated and technical that explaining it might just annoy the customer.

Not so good

Oops! We're sorry! You've encountered an asynchronous error. Please try again.

We don't use exclamations in copy. And we generally don't say we're sorry. A machine is delivering this message, and our users can see through the false empathy. As for the "asynchronous error" copy, we try really hard to keep our content conversational. Unless you're a developer, you probably haven't used the word asynchronous with your friends in the past two weeks.
Good content at the right time

Good

Get it done

Get paid

Zero in on the benefit and use visuals to help keep content simple and clean.

Not so good

Send invoices, track them, get paid

Don’t try to shove all the features in a banner ad at once. It ends up overwhelming users and is visually unattractive.
Defining chart of accounts

Good

Here’s the list of categories you’ll use to organize transactions. We call this your chart of accounts.

This introduces an accounting term by explaining it in an accessible way, and then giving it an official name.

Not so good

Your Chart of Accounts is a list of all the accounts you use to record transactions in your general ledger.

Starting with the accounting term intimidates people right away. Using jargon to define it makes them feel confused and adrift.